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Carly Fengel1 Morgan Brown2 Michael Reynolds3 Kathryn McGill3 Samantha Norris3 Tyler Kirby4 Jan Lammerding4 Patrick Chappell5 Paul McEuen3 Ethan Minot1

1, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, United States
2, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, United States
3, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States
4, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States
5, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, United States

Graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) have unique properties that make them ideal candidates for recording the activity of electrogenic cells. Graphene is mechanically strong yet flexible enough to conform to irregular shapes. Transistors made from graphene are capable of locally amplifying small voltage signals. Lastly, graphene is optically transparent and biocompatible. Here we present the use of ultra-flexible GFETs for recording action potentials from individual neurons. Measurements have been performed in two configurations. (1) A “standard” configuration with GFETs on a rigid substrate and neurons cultured on top of the GFETs. (2) A novel wearable graphene sensor configuration, in which the GFET is released from the substrate and placed over a neuron. The wearable graphene configuration makes use of graphene’s intrinsic strength and flexibility. Cells remain active while in contact with the wearable sensor and high signal-to-noise ratios are demonstrated. These proof-of-concept measurements demonstrate new possibilities for ultra-flexible brain-machine interfaces.

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